It’s a Bird, it’s a Plane, it’s a Trusty Sidekick!

TSK flyer_WhoAreWe_USletter_v2-1My absolute favorite project to date for 2015 went live this morning, allowing me to brag about it on my blog finally. Back in late May I was contacted by Jen, a consultant with international experience who had decided to go it on her own and needed a copywriter for her new website, with quite frankly the best name ever – Trusty Sidekick.com

With our common admiration of all things superhero, we had several excellent collaborative discussions on Skype and via email, and I got to do all the copywriting for a super (pun intended) project, writing all of her one-pagers (mini case studies) and the rest.

Her format was so cool that it inspired me to start producing my own one-pagers, which are far less visually spectacular, but hopefully give TME clients and potential clients a little more insight into what I can do.

Best of luck, Jen!

 

New Whitepaper Published: “Layperson’s Guide to Hosting Services”

As I’ve mentioned in prior posts, and to paraphrase SNL baseball legend Chico Escuela, “Whitepapers and case studies have been very, very good to me”

A project that came to me right at the beginning of 2015 has reached fruition with Australia’s Elcom publishing the “Layperson’s Guide to Hosting Services.”

It’s a free download if you’re interested, and a great reminder to all freelance writers out there that the death of the newspaper business might just have been the best thing that ever happened to us.

 

 

Freelancing in a Digital World … and I am a Digital, well, guy, but still

When I started Twin Miracles Editorial three years ago, most of the jobs I pursued were of the editing and proofreading variety. Why? Because we had two little babies at home, and my brain was better suited for being able to pick out comma splices and run-on sentences a lot better on less sleep than it was coming up with innovative leads, compelling copy, and majestic marketing pieces.

The Twin Miracles are now three years old which means a little more sleep for America’s No. 1 superhero, Freelancing Dad, and here lately more and more writing work has come my way, particularly in the form of creating copy and content for any number of digital technology sites as more and more people go into business for themselves as consultants, designers, and the like.

As little as two years ago, I probably couldn’t have told you jack squat about the advance of digital technology in business, but a random job copy editing for Australia’s Inside SAP (I miss working with you, Freya!) followed by a six-month stint as an editor for Techopedia opened up my eyes and got parts of my mind humming again that had previously only been used to measure out baby formula and try to remember who last pooped when.

Now the digital writing jobs are coming in fast and furious, and it’s a great time to be a freelancer as more people strike out to be their own bosses and run their own show, but still need help making it all sound sophisticated and smart to potential customers.

If you’re in the market for copy or content writing for your digital business, check out my services page for more information on what I’ve done and how it’s been received, or simply contact me at twinmiracleseditorial@gmail.com or on Skype at TMEditorial.

Art Therapy – The Latest Cool Thing I Know Nothing About

One of my most recent clients was a gentleman from Australia who specializes in Art as Therapy for both children and adults. I got to edit and touch up an article he had written for a magazine down under, but the real winner in the deal was me, as I got to learn a lot about this tremendously cool field of help / self-help. His website has a great 5-minute video on how art can be used as therapy that I’d recommend to anyone with an interest in either field.

The Evolution of the Employee

employee graphicOne of my contacts on LinkedIn had this great looking graphic on their page today, and I felt like sharing it because it is a great reflection of Twin Miracles Editorial and the path I’ve been able to forge the last few years as a full-time freelancer.

  • Work anytime? Check, I’ve edited books from 9-to-5, and yes from 9 p.m. to 5 a.m, too!
  • Work anywhere? Check, my house, the doctor’s office, Starbucks (yum!), waiting in lines, waiting at the DMV, sitting in my truck outside a McDonald’s that one time when our wireless was out at home …
  • Use any device? So far just my laptop and my wife’s desktop, but it’s good to know I could if I had to.
  • Focused on outputs? Yep, every project I do results in something being created – whether it’s a new version of something old, or completely original work. It’s very fulfilling.
  • Create my own ladder? Maybe the best part. Who’s the president of your company? Me. The CEO? Me again. The janitor? Well, also me, but hey at least I get paid the same salary as the owner!

I wish … people could learn … to use … ellipses … correctly

I love that the Internet gives people who might never have considered writing a book the opportunity to do for a fairly low cost and fairly easily – it gives me plenty of extra work and occasionally a true diamond in the rough to be a part of.

But so many authors seem obsessed with the use of ellipses in their writing. They string them throughout paragraphs like so many Christmas lights, and clearly haven’t the faintest idea what they are doing.

In my journalism background, we only used them to express that words were being cut out either at the beginning, in the middle, or at the end of a sentence.

In other written works, particularly novels, they are used for dialogue that is trailing off, for surprise or for a change of pace in conversation. Unfortunately, they are over-used, often taking the place of my favorite punctuation friend, the comma, who is vastly more economical and enjoys letting people know when it’s time to pause.

But now I see the ellipses everywhere, bulling its way into places formerly reserved for commas, colons, and semicolons, and laying havoc to any sort of thought continuity in their path like a herd of beagle descending on a butcher’s shop after an earthquake.

Please, please, dear writers, use your ellipses sparingly and correctly. I’m asking you … nicely.

Academic Editing Makes Me Smarter

A funny thing happened not too long ago, I was able to give my mom a quick lesson in the types of discrimination felt by teacher applicants in public school districts in Oklahoma. Why would I have this trove of available information? Because I edited a dissertation about it.

Academic editing, which I’m currently doing now for another client on the interesting topic of “Choice Fatigue”, has developed into one of my favorite types of work to take on. Not only is the level of writing (usually) outstanding, but I’m almost always guaranteed to learn something new, something interesting, and something that’s going to make me think.

The point I’ve made 50 times before on this blog can’t be overstated. Being a freelance editor takes you places you’d never thought you’d see, and it’s one of the things I’m most grateful for in this profession.